• WELCOME! BIENVENIDOS!

    Thank you for visiting my website. Whatever the journey that brought you here may be, from whatever parts of the world you call home, however unique your background, whether you’re a fan, or a seeker who stumbled upon it while sailing the oceans of the internet, I am honored that you’ve taken the time to stop by.

    Please look around. Feel free to explore, comment and discuss. I hope that there is something here for each and every one of you. I’ve developed this site for the past several months as a home away from home, a virtual avatar that represents some of my personality, my passions and my many pursuits. It is a work-in-progress, always growing, learning, and transforming, as we all do on our own journey through life. I hope that you return often, and let us know your own thoughts on any of the subjects and items we’ve placed here. This site is as much for you as it is for me. I learned this valuable lesson while working on the incredible show Battlestar Galactica, from the fans themselves. The commitment, passion and online interaction from the fans shaped the very structure, and soul of the show. I hope to continue on that path of interconnectedness with you all, through this website.

    For many of you it will be a place from which to invite me to speak at your graduation, or find a personal autograph of myself, or to vent a personal concern. It is all that and more. I hope that there is something here for everyone. Please stay as long as you like - mi casa es su casa.

    Thank you for your continued love and support. “SO SAY WE ALL!”
    My Warmest Regards, Edward James Olmos

    Edward James Olmos

  • ABOUT EJO

    SELECT THIS LINK TO VIEW MOVIE HIGHLIGHTS

    Who is Edward James Olmos at heart? What makes the man tick? What motivates him to do the things he does? He is everything he appears to be: intelligent, talented, warm, friendly, funny. He is wise and compassionate. He is a brilliant actor and director who has been well honored in his career. He is completely devoted to the happiness and well-being of his family. He is proud of his Mexican heritage and is a passionate supporter of Latinos everywhere. He works hard in every situation to do the right thing even when the "right thing" is not the easiest thing. And, even when it isn't easy, he practices what he preaches.

    EJO spent several years helping to have created the book, video and CD entitled Americanos: Latino Life in the United States. In many ways, it was a labor of love for him.

    "Why Americanos? Why would we give this title to a book on Latinos? There are several reasons. One is that too often society sees us not as Americans but as strangers to this land. We have worked hard to help build this country and we continue to do so every day. The face of America should include us. Second, as Latinos we often think of Americanos as the others in this country, not us. We, and especially our children, need to see that we are an integral and equal part of U.S. society. Third, we wanted a title that would recognize and honor our bilingual heritage and would be easily understood in both English and Spanish. And, finally, we wanted to illustrate that, much like a quilt woven intricately with many beautiful fibers, Latinos are a proud and diverse people interwoven with indigenous, Spanish/European, African, and Asian roots. We are citizens not only of the United States of America, but also of all the Americas and of the Latin American countries around the world." --

    Edward James Olmos from the preface of Americanos Latino Life in the United States

    :: THERE'S ONLY ONE RACE, THE HUMAN RACE ::

    "...Edward James Olmos was correct in the United Nations changing its language on race... their actions were reflected in their Durban Review Conference" In March of 2009, EJO (and other members of the "Battlestar Galactica" cast) was given the opportunity to speak at the United Nations. EJO spoke of a matter close to his heart, that of "race" versus ethnicity. "I still find it incredible that we still use word “race” as a cultural determinant… I detest what we’ve done to ourselves. Out of a need to make ourselves different from one another, we’ve made the word “race” a way of expressing culture. There’s no such thing... I just heard one of the most prolific statements done by one of the great humanitarians, he’s really trying to organize and bring us together, and he used the word “race” as if there is a Latino race, an Asian race, an indigenous race, a Caucasian race. There’s no such thing as a Latino race. There never has been. There never will be. There’s only one race, and that’s what the show brought out. That is the human race, period."

    :: THE L.A. RIOTS ::

    While the 1992 so-called "Rodney King" riots was going on in Los Angeles, EJO decided that something positive had to be done to stop the violence and protect lives and property. He grabbed a broom and hit the streets. About the event he says: "I was out on the morning that the military were scheduled to start to shoot to kill anyone left on the streets. That's why I went out. I wanted to see if they would shoot me with a broom in my hand. Then, people saw it and turned out by the tens of thousands... The riot had not stopped - not until the afternoon of the Friday we went out. [It's] funny how people think we went out after the fact. We were the fact of why the riot stopped. One person with a broom in his hands.... it just happened to be me."

    :: VIEQUES ::

    In 2001 EJO became very involved and concerned with the US Navy using Vieques Island as a practice bombing range. The 9,000 citizens of the island were tired of the ordinance exploded in their waters, the damage to the environment the bombing had caused, and the illnesses among them linked to the aftermath of the bombing. EJO and nearly 180 other people were arrested for trespassing in an effort to stop a scheduled Navy bombing practice on the island. Over the next several months all were given prison sentences as punishment. Edward was sentenced to twenty days. After serving his sentence at a detention facility in San Juan, he was released on August 24th, 2001 SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Edward James Olmos criticized the United States and Puerto Rico on Tuesday for not moving faster to clean up the site of a former bombing range on Vieques Island. [Officials] "have done nothing" to restore an area that environmentalists say is tainted by dangerous pollutants nearly four years after the departure of the U.S. Navy."We are not going to stop until we make them see that a (cleanup) is necessary," Olmos said at a news conference in the Puerto Rican capital of San Juan.

    :: COMMUNITY ::

    EJO keeps a busy lecture schedule. He speaks on a vast range of humanitarian topics that promote tolerance and understanding among all people.

    "Education is the vaccine for violence."

    "We have all the cultures of the world under one flag, and we let it all slip through our fingers. We have got to start with our educational systems." “ “How can children of color gain a feeling of sense, of self-worth, self-esteem, and self-respect by citing a European based history? Yet nothing is being done about changing it. While English is the global language of business, children in other parts of the world are learning to speak three or four deifferent languages. If they speak only English, your children will be behind the eight-ball.

    I came from a dysfunctional family. I’m a minority. I have no natural talent, but I did it. If I can do it, anybody can do it. I take away the excuses.” The most important thing I learned to do was do the things I loved, even when I didn’t want to do them.”

    "Every single person ... still uses the understanding that there is a Caucasian ‘race,’ that there is an Asian ‘race,’ that there is an African ‘race,’ and an indigenous ‘race.’ Well, I’m here to tell you, you should have never invited me if you didn’t want to learn one thing today: and that’s that there’s only one race, and that’s the human race. Period. "

    "I wish that our colleges were filled with people who had come through a system of grammar school, junior high and high school that would have given them a sense of self-esteem and self-worth and self-respect. But you can’t get that in a system that is dedicated to a one-course diet." "I am not naturally gifted, not naturally talented. I did not come out of my mother's womb saying 'to be or not to be' with a Spanish accent. I say this to you because I see that...we still have a problem understanding that the only thing that makes us the same is that we are all different. Racism is tough. It's a learned behavior, just like violence is." "Yes, there was a conquest. Yes, it was done out of force, not out of love. America was forged out of a history of violence, but today what dominates us is love. More people live together in this country than in any country in the world."

    "One day I was following my brother, who was crossing First Street. I got scared about two -thirds of the way across and turned around and almost got hit. But when I turned around I saw my sister following me. I grabbed her hand and pulled her back. From then on I knew I was being looked up to by my little sister. I would make sure I knew where she was so that I wouldn't lead her into some kind of trouble. I knew that I was an example for her; I had an understanding of that."

    "We have relegated art the fourth toe of the foot on the left side. I need it badly, but I need my backbone even more. But art is the backbone.We would have nothing without art. That's why they call them artifacts -- without them we would not have known anything."

    “I’ve spent my entire adult life trying to realize how in the world are we ever going to come together when we keep on using the word ‘race’ as a cultural determinant. How can we even look at one another and understand our unity of humanness when we consider ourselves different races? It’s so difficult that it boggles the mind.

  • Advocacy!

    THE IMAGES of the dark, complex characters Edward James Olmos portrays in many of his dramatic roles do no justice to the warm-hearted man he really is. Not only is he very much admired as an actor, but, also, Latinos have found in Olmos a spokesman, an activist whose energies are devoted to help his community. Edward James Olmos, whose grandfather published a radical newspaper during the Mexican Revolution, wants a legacy beyond entertainment. “I would hate to look back on my life and only see myself as a person who made lots of money and was a star and made Rambo and Terminator movies,” he has said. Indeed, he devotes his personal life to public service. Olmos has served as a U.S. goodwill ambassador for UNICEF and as a national spokesperson for the Southwest Voter Registration Project, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, the AIDS Awareness Foundation, and Students against Driving Drunk (SADD), among others.

    Olmos was arrested and spent twenty days in prison in 1991 for taking part in protests against the U.S. Navy's bombings of the island of Vieques, Puerto Rico. For his instrumental role in peacekeeping after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, he received the John Anson Ford Award and was honored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for his leadership toward racial unity. He has been active in emergency relief efforts, from organizing a relief fund for the victims of the 1985 Mexico City earthquake to advocating for the victims of the 1994 Los Angeles earthquake.

    In 1997 Olmos was executive producer of the anti–domestic violence documentary It Ain't Love, for which he was given the PASS Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency. In 1999 he launched a nationwide multimedia project cosponsored by Time Warner, Inc., called Americanos: Latino Life in the United States. A celebration of Latino and Latina culture, this high-profile project is designed to expose Latino and Latina culture, diversity, and accomplishments to the world through a five-year traveling photography exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution, a music CD, an HBO and a PBS documentary, and a photo-essay book.

    “We would have nothing without art,” Olmos often says in one of his lectures. As “an individual who makes outstanding contributions to emerging filmmakers,” Olmos has been awarded an Eastman Second Century Award. For years, he has coproduced the Latino Book and Family Festival, and he is the cofounder of the prestigious Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival. Since 1999 Olmos has headed Latino Public Broadcasting, a consortium that allocates funds to Latino and Latina filmmakers for enhancing and enriching diversity on public television across America.

    For more than two decades Edward James Olmos has advocated tirelessly for Latino and Latina communities, but his efforts for social justice transcend racial lines. “I've spent my entire adult life trying to realize how in the world are we ever going to come together when we keep on using the word ‘race’ as a cultural determinant,” said Olmos in a commencement speech in San Diego, California. “There's only one race, and that's the human race. Period.”

    Edward James Olmos Biography - (b. 1947), Acting Career, Public Service, Political Activism, Zoot Suit, Miami Vice

  • THE RHYTHMIC ARTS PROJECT

    VISIT THE RHYTHMIC ARTS PROJECT WEBSITE Thank you all for reading, I wish to bring awareness to The Rhythmic Arts Project. I encourage you to visit their website and support their services.
    Help us celebrate! A cast of amazing players, good food, drink, silent auction, bake sale, and a family friendly environment with face painting, slides and sand box for the children, The TRAP Family Picnic promises to be a day that no-one will soon forget. Sunday, June 5, 2011: Lion’s Park, Carpinteria, CA. :1PM until 5PM. Tickets are $20.00: Information at: 805 745 8280: Ask for Traci or Eddie: Call to reserve or buy your tickets now.

  • Americanos Project

    EJO spent several years helping to have created the book, video and CD entitled Americanos: Latino Life in the United States. In many ways, it was a labor of love for him. Why Americanos? Why would we give this title to a book on Latinos? There are several reasons. One is that too often society sees us not as Americans but as strangers to this land. We have worked hard to help build this country and we continue to do so every day. The face of America should include us. Second, as Latinos we often think of Americanos as the others in this country, not us. We, and especially our children, need to see that we are an integral and equal part of U.S. society. Third, we wanted a title that would recognize and honor our bilingual heritage and would be easily understood in both English and Spanish. And, finally, we wanted to illustrate that, much like a quilt woven intricately with many beautiful fibers, Latinos are a proud and diverse people interwoven with indigenous, Spanish/European, African, and Asian roots. We are citizens not only of the United States of America, but also of all the Americas and of the Latin American countries around the world. -- Edward James Olmos, Preface of Americanos: "Latino Life in the United States"

  • Sexto Sol

    According to the Maya calendar, we have entered the Sixth Sun, El Sexto Sol, the time of Justice and of the Emancipation of indigenous peoples. Edward James Olmos has been a friend of the non-profit Sexto Sol Center since 1997. We are grateful to him for generously providing this opportunity to tell you about our work to contribute to the betterment of people's lives. Our heartfelt thanks to his fans whose contributions to Sexto Sol's projects in his honor makes our service to the people possible. (See special request from Edward James Olmos below.)

    On a planet with such abundant life and resources, poverty should not exist. It is possible to create a sustainable world in which all people live with dignity and enjoy good health in harmony with nature. It's going to take commitment, creativity and a new vision. The revolution gains momentum every time you respond without hesitation to the urge to act from kindness.


    :: WHAT WE DO ::
    The Sexto Sol Center for Community Action serves impoverished communities in Chiapas, Mexico and Guatemala where a change of perspective and technical assistance can help them create a better life. Since 1997 we have assisted people to: create success with their cooperative businesses, grow healthful food, improve neglected schools for their children, re-establish cultural pride, protect the watershed, create eco-villages and heal from the trauma of disaster and war. We lobby internationally for the respect of the human rights of indigenous peoples and environmental and economic justice. Through our volunteer and internship program we teach others to do this work where it is needed. We aim to inspire others to take action for the people and the planet. Sexto Sol works in one corner of the world to in a way we hope ripples out beyond.
    :: CURRENT FOCUS ::


    Sustainable Livelihoods Program: In a region with few opportunities to earn a living, Sexto Sol helps grassroots organizations to sell their products internationally. We work with emerging cooperatives and associations since collective effort builds social support among members, forms leaders and encourages people taking ownership of the development of their community.
    We help groups learn what they need to independently managing of their own business. Sexto Sol facilitates partnerships between the cooperative and companies interested in importing their products. For cooperatives of coffee growers this means helping them to export to buyers in the Specialty Coffee market who pay more for fair trade and organic coffee. (Help Sexto Sol by buying Higher Grounds Coffee, see bottom of this page.) Environmental Justice: Empowering indigenous people to defend their rights, the health of their communities and their territories. Recycling, Upcycling: Tons of plastic trash washes into the Canyon de Sumidero each year. Sexto Sol is working to give this refuse a second life by tranforming it into saleable household items that can be produced by people working from their homes. Eco-village/Permaculture: Building on the sucess of helping Nuevo Bullaj cooperative export their Fair Trade coffee, we are helping these repatriated refugees in Gautemala to create an Eco-hotel and guiding them to trasform their community into an eco-village. Helping people heal from the trauma of war and disaster: As a response to Hurricane Stan, Sexto Sol sponsored training for 50 local doctors and healers in a unique technique to heal Post Traumatic Stress for the large numbers of people affected by the tragedy. Mr. Olmos and his fans provided significant support to make this possible. This work is evolving as we continue to help people cope with traumatic life events. read more...
    Improving the Quality of Education for Indigenous Children:. Education is an essential tool for constructing a way out of poverty. Ideally communities should be involved in assuring the quality of education for their children as part of the process of regaining self-determination. However, the schools serving indigenous children in the Sierra are terribly neglected and teachers must work with very inadequate facilities and materials. Sexto Sol works with parent organizations to improve the buildings and grounds and assists teachers to find ways to make the original culture and language more central to instruction. We provide books to build school libraries and encourage children to read both in Chiapas and Guatemala. By helping parents and teachers to improve the schools, the community is enriched by the pride that comes from giving their children a better education.

    :: HOW CAN YOU HELP ::

    A Special Request for Help from Edward James Olmos:
    The Sexto Sol Center for Community Action has informed me that they were very grateful for your significant support in 2008 for their relief efforts for survivors of Hurricane Stan in Chiapas, Mexico. The non-profit is now in its 12th year of helping people to address poverty in the remote mountain communities in the Sierra Madre. They do this by working with small-scale coffee growers and by teaching people to grow their own food with permaculture, among other strategies.
    An important part of their work to confront poverty is to provide assistance to schools that serve indigenous children. These schools are unique because they are the only places where indigenous children can receive some teaching in their own language in a region where local cultures are under pressure. But as bilingual schools, they receive only a fraction of the funding that other schools do. The buildings are in terrible shape and teachers do not have adequate materials for teaching. Sexto Sol works with schools that don't have proper buildings including one that is located in the flood zone.
    Sexto Sol organizes the parents and teachers to make improvements to the buildings and to create attractive play areas for the children. They provide the paint, landscaping materials and training needed to get the job done. They also provide a significant amount of books to schools for libraries to encourage children to read.
    Francisco and Tamara, the field team of the Sexto Sol Center, ask for your collaboration to improve the education these children receive by making a contribution to this effort. For more information on the work of the Sexto Sol Center, please see www.sextosol.org. They asked me to tell you that "Changing the world is a team effort". They'd appreciate having you as part of the team. I encourage you to consider making a contribution.
    Thank you, Edward James Olmos
    :: GET INVOLVED ::
    Since 2005 we have assisted the bilingual schools in the municipalities of Motozintla and El Porvenir in Chiapas and the community formed by repatriated refugees, Nuevo Bullaj in Guatemala. The Organización de Cultura Maya is a new coalition of indigenous educators and activists dedicated to bringing the Mam and Mocho languages into the schools in the attempt to rescue the languages that are in danger of disappearing. At their request Sexto Sol helps them to develop this important program. We also assist the community of Nuevo Bullaj to revive their culture for their children as a necessary step to recovering from life in exile when they fled the war. Sexto Sol helps parents and teachers to improve the schools so that children can truly learn while the community is enriched by the pride that comes from giving their children a better education.
    These days Sexto Sol Center services are needed more than ever before. Help us keep our commitments to poor communities that want to improve their conditions. The Sexto Sol Center is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt non-profit. All contributions are tax deductible. There are many ways you can help. Please click here for Sexto Sol donations:
    Through Sexto Sol projects we encourage people to use community action whereby community members work together to solve common problems and reach shared goals. For more information about Sexto Sol's projects, please click on the following link....www.sextosol.org

  • Latino Book & Family Festival

    Latino Book & Family Festival It’s my pleasure to personally invite you to participate in the Latino Book & Family Festival. This major event showcases the diversity and importance of our multicultural community.
    Back in 1997 I made a five-year commitment to help build the Latino Book & Family Festival into one of the best and widely appreciated festivals anywhere. Due to the ongoing success of this event and because so many cities are showing an active interest in holding these festivals, I’m happy to now affirm a lifetime commitment to the Latino Book & Family Festival.
    Our series of events is designed to give companies - large and small - direct access to Hispanic consumers by providing a noise-controlled, business friendly environment where they can promote brands, sample and sell products, improve corporate image and demonstrate new product innovations to the largest minority group in the United States today. It is a unique marketing platform that has a proven track record of results.
    Our organization is called Latino Literacy Now, a non-profit corporation 501(c)(3). Our cause is promoting reading as a means of improving lives, both professionally and personally. Our goal is improved literacy throughout the Latino community. Your contributions are tax-deductible and appreciated. You may also support Latino Literacy Now by checking out our “Support Partners” on the column to the right. A portion of sales from these initiatives help support our programs.
    I invite everyone to join our cause and help us reach our goal.
    ABOUT THE BOOK FESTIVAL
    Edward James Olmos, actor and community activist, is the Co-Producer of Latino Book & Family Festival, a weekend event that promotes literacy, culture and education in a fun environment for the whole family. The festival is held in key Hispanic markets across the country. The Latino Book & Family Festival was launched in 1997 in Los Angeles to promote literacy, culture and education and to provide people of all ages and backgrounds the opportunity to celebrate the diversity of the multicultural communities in the United States in a festival atmosphere. Today, the Festival is hosted in several major Latino markets across the U.S. including Houston, Dallas, Chicago and Los Angeles. Future expansion plans will take the Festival to New York City, Miami, the San Francisco Bay Area and many other major Latino markets.

  • LA Riots


    While the 1992 so-called "Rodney King" riots was going on in Los Angeles, EJO decided that something positive had to be done to stop the violence and protect lives and property. He grabbed a broom and hit the streets.
    About the event he says: "I was out on the morning that the military were scheduled to start to shoot to kill anyone left on the streets. That's why I went out. I wanted to see if they would shoot me with a broom in my hand. Then, people saw it and turned out by the tens of thousands...
    The riot had not stopped - not until the afternoon of the Friday we went out.
    It's funny how people think we went out after the fact. We were the fact of why the riot stopped. One person with a broom in his hands.... it just happened to be me."

  • Vienques Puerto Rico

    In 2001 EJO became very involved and concerned with the US Navy using Vieques Island as a practice bombing range. The 9,000 citizens of the island were tired of the ordinance exploded in their waters, the damage to the environment the bombing had caused, and the illnesses among them linked to the aftermath of the bombing.
    EJO and nearly 180 other people were arrested for trespassing in an effort to stop a scheduled Navy bombing practice on the island. Included in the arrests were Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and US Representative Luis Gutierrez (D-IL). Over the next several months all were given prison sentences as punishment. Edward was sentenced to twenty days. After serving his sentence at a detention facility in San Juan, he was released on August 24th, 2001.
    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Edward James Olmos criticized the United States and Puerto Rico on Tuesday for not moving faster to clean up the site of a former bombing range on Vieques Island. “[Officials] have done nothing to restore an area that environmentalists say is tainted by dangerous pollutants nearly four years after the departure of the U.S. Navy. We are not going to stop until we make them see that a (cleanup) is necessary," Olmos said at a news conference in the Puerto Rican capital of San Juan.
    As a result of this pressure, and the continued resistance by the poeple of Vieques, in May 2003 the Navy withdrew from Vieques, and much of the island was designated a National Wildlife Refuge under the control of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Closure of Roosevelt Roads Naval Station followed in 2004.

  • Race and Humanity

    SELECT THIS LINK TO VIEW EJO AT THE UNITED NATIONS

    The use of the word race as a cultural determinate and as a tool of exclusivity, control and inhumanity is a very important issue to EJO. He believes that the abuse of the term takes away self-worth, self-respect, and self-dignity from our fellow human being. Battlestar Glactica is widely praised for tackling current issues – including many that are controversial and difficult. It’s bravery for addressing perhaps some of the most important topics and problems facing the collective “us” on the planet, was recognized and rewarded by the United Nations.A special BSG Panel was held at the UN, where leaders from the different United Nations Councils showed clips from the show and discussed the shows importance in attacking the same issues they fight on a daily basis. A forum for discussion was then opened to some cast members and creators of the show, EJO was one of them. During the panel a Council Leader used the word “race” when speaking of the UN Charter on Human Rights, which lead to the following remarks by EJO: "I still find it incredible that we still use word “race” as a cultural determinant… I detest what we’ve done to ourselves. Out of a need to make ourselves different from one another, we’ve made the word “race” a way of expressing culture. There’s no such thing... I just heard one of the most prolific statements done by one of the great humanitarians, he’s really trying to organize and bring us together, and he used the word “race” as if there is a Latino race, an Asian race, an indigenous race, a Caucasian race. There’s no such thing as a Latino race. There never has been. There never will be. There’s only one race, and that’s what the show brought out. That is the human race, period." A few weeks later, the panel was brought to Los Angeles and while there it was mentioned to EJO that his words had a resonating effect, and that in fact the issue of misuse of the word “race” was on it’s way to being corrected in policy by the UN. EJO interpreted this to mean the UN Charter on Human Rights, but alas it was not. Still his passion and opportunity collided and his words did not fall on deaf ears: Note: Though Edward James Olmos was correct in the United Nations changing its language on race, their actions were reflected in their Durban Review Conference, global summit on combating racism, which now states: "6. Reaffirms that all peoples and individuals constitute one human family, rich in diversity, and that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights; and strongly rejects any doctrine of racial superiority along with theories which attempt to determine the existence of so-called distinct human races." Though the United Nations' Charter has not been amended, Olmos' strong advocacy for human rights on behalf of Battlestar Galactica has clearly influenced the mindset of the global organization.
    --Taken from the G4 Blog: Attack of the Show--

  • Merchandise

    Items and links are subject to change.

    Viper Mark II Artisan Replica

    SELECT THIS LINK TO VIEW EJO DISCUSSING THE VIPER

    • Now you can join the fight against the Cylons with this frakkin’ awesome Viper Mark II Artisan Replica from QMx. The QMx Viper Mark II Artisan Replica boasts a cockpit chock full of hand-cut details, including gauges, data screens, throttle, ejection seat, and seat belts with fabric belts and metalized buckles. But the pièce de résistance of the QMx Viper is the active, working DRADIS – a 9/16” OLED (organic light-emitting diode) video display of the remote sensing system in action, displaying the actual DRADIS video used in Battlestar Galactica. The canopy can be opened for an optimal view of the cockpit and this first-ever digital model effect. To check it out or order: select this link.


    • EJO T Shirt

      • You can have your sparkling, fangless Twilight vampires. There's only one "Edward" whose team I want to be on. EDWARD JAMES OLMOS! Whether he's inspiring inner city kids, tracking down replicants or leading the Colonial Fleet to victory against the Cylons, EJO has always got your back. Shouldn't you return the favor?. To check it out or order: select this link. **Delivery is typically 2 weeks in the USA. Canada & International will almost always take longer.


      • BSG/UN "So Say We All" T-Shirt

        • This T-Shirt commemorates the historic meeting between the cast of Battlestar Galactica and delegates from the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland in April of 2009 in which an impassioned speech from Edward James Olmos (Admiral William Adama) resulted in the UN reconsidering its stance on using the word "race" as a cultural determinant. "There is but one race. The human race. Period. So say we all.": select this link. **Delivery is typically 2 weeks in the USA. Canada & International will almost always take longer.


        • BSG Personalized Artisan Dog Tags

          • Personalized Artisan Dog Tags include two tags made of solid antique brass with a protective coating, measuring 1.1562" wide by 1.3125" tall by 0.0937" thick – exactly the same size as the screen-used tags from Battlestar Galactica. The phoenix emblem, lettering size and style are also taken directly from the screen-used prop. select this link. Your custom dog tag set also includes a 24" golden chain and comes inside a natural muslin bag stored inside an aluminum case 3.9" long by 2.5" wide and 0.9" tall. Both the bag and case have the Battlestar Galactica emblem silkscreened on them. Your tags will also come with matching six-digit serial numbers that will be unique to your set (or you can request your own serial number). They will have the first initial and last name of your choice (entered in the field at the top of this page) up to a maximum of 20 characters, including any punctuation.
  • WANT TO TOUCH BASE WITH EJO?

    Please fill in the following form to contact us





    * Are you human ?

  • Please use this contact form:

    • MaryAnn T. Beverly, Web Mistress and assistant to Mr. Olmos, will pass along your communication

Latest News

This Panel

Is under construction.